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Sweet Edible Flowers! Yes, its a Thing!

Updated: Jun 26, 2019

There are hundreds of edible flowers but, for the sake of our sweet tooth, we’re only focusing on the sweet ones listed by What’s Cooking America.




  1. Carnations: Carnations can be steeped in wine, candy, or use as cake decoration.  To use the surprisingly sweet petals in desserts, cut them away from the bitter white base of the flower.  Dianthus are the miniature member of the carnation family with light clove-like or nutmeg scent. Petals add color to salads or aspics.  Carnation petals are one of secret ingredients that has been used to make Chartreuse, a French liqueur, since the 17th century.

  2. Cornflower: Also called Bachelors button.  They have a slightly sweet to spicy, clove-like flavor.  Bloom is a natural food dye.  More commonly used as garnish.

  3. Dandelion: A Member of the Daisy family.  Flowers are sweetest when picked young.  They have a sweet, honey-like flavor.  Mature flowers are bitter.  Dandelion buds are tastier than the flowers: best to pick these when they are very close to the ground, tightly bunched in the center, and about the size of a small gumball.  Good raw or steamed.  Also made into wine.  Young leaves taste good steamed, or tossed in salads.  When serving a rice dish use dandelion petals like confetti over the rice.

  4. Day Lilies: Slightly sweet with a mild vegetable flavor, like sweet lettuce or melon.  Their flavor is a combination of asparagus and zucchini.  Chewable consistency.  Some people think that different colored blossoms have different flavors.  To use the surprisingly sweet petals in desserts, cut them away from the bitter white base of the flower.  Also great to stuff like squash blossoms.  Flowers look beautiful on composed salad platters or crowning a frosted cake.  Sprinkle the large petals in a spring salad.  In the spring, gather shoots two or three inches tall and use as a substitute for asparagus.  NOTE: Many Lilies contain alkaloids and are NOT edible.  Day Lilies may act as a diuretic or laxative; eat in moderation.

  5. Gladiolus: Flowers (anthers removed) have a nondescript flavor (taste vaguely like lettuce) but make lovely receptacles for sweet or savory spreads or mousses. Toss individual petals in salads. It can also be cooked like a day lily.

  6. Honeysuckle: Sweet honey flavor. Only the flowers are edible.  NOTE: Berries are highly poisonous – Do not eat them!

  7. Impatiens: The flowers have a sweet flavor.  They can be used as a garnish in salads or floated in drinks.

  8. Nasturtiums: Come in varieties ranging from trailing to upright and in brilliant sunset colors with peppery flavors.  Nasturtiums rank among most common edible flowers.  Blossoms have a sweet,spicy flavor similar to watercress.  Stuff whole flowers with savory mousse.  Leaves add peppery tang to salads.  Pickled seed pods are less expensive substitute for capers.  Use entire flowers to garnish platters, salads, cheese tortas, open-faced sandwiches, and savory appetizers.

  9. Pansies: They have a slightly sweet green or grassy flavor.  If you eat only the petals, the flavor is extremely mild, but if you eat the whole flower, there is a winter, green overtone.  Use them as garnishes, in fruit salads, green salad, desserts or in soups.

  10. Roses: Flavor reminiscent of strawberries and green apples.  Sweet, with subtle undertones ranging from fruit to mint to spice.  All roses are edible, with the flavor being more pronounced in the darker varieties.  In miniature varieties can garnish ice cream and desserts, or larger petals can be sprinkled on desserts or salads.  Freeze them in ice cubes and float them in punches also.  Petals used in syrups, jellies, perfumed butters and sweet spreads.

  11. Violets: (Viola species) – Sweet, perfumed flavor.  Related flowers, Johnny jump-ups or violas, and pansies now come in colorful purples and yellows to apricot and pastel hues.  I like to eat the tender leaves and flowers in salads.  I also use the flowers to beautifully embellish desserts and iced drinks.  Freeze them in punches to delight children and adults alike.  All of these flowers make pretty adornments for frosted cakes, sorbets, or any other desserts, and they may be crystallized as well.  Heart-shaped leaves are edible, and tasty when cooked like spinach.

  12. Elderberry Blossoms:  The blossoms are a creamy color and have a sweet scent and sweet taste.  When harvesting elderberry flowers, do not wash them as that removes much of the fragrance and flavor.  Instead check them carefully for insects.  The fruit is used to make wine.  The flowers, leaves, berries, bark and roots have all been used in traditional folk medicine for centuries. 

  13. Lavender: Sweet, floral flavor, with lemon and citrus notes. Flowers look beautiful and taste good too in a glass of champagne, with chocolate cake, or as a garnish for sorbets or ice creams. Lavender lends itself to savory dishes also, from hearty stews to wine-reduced sauces. Diminutive blooms add a mysterious scent to custards, flans or sorbets.

Pea Blossoms: Edible garden peas bloom mostly in white, but may have other pale coloring. The blossoms are slightly sweet and crunchy and they taste like peas. The shoots and vine tendrils are edible, with a delicate, pea-like flavor. Here again, remember that harvesting blooms will diminish your pea harvest, so you may want to plant extra. NOTE: Flowering ornamental sweet peas are poisonous – do not eat.


Sweet Woodruff: Also known as Wild Baby’s Breath.  The flower flavor is sweet and grassy with a hint of nutty, vanilla flavor. 


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